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Slow Fashion with Stacey Dooley

Style The Slip With Stacey

Stacey Dooley shows us how to do elegance sustainably

From daring documentaries, to daring dress-sense, journalist Stacey Dooley covers it all.  Click here to read her latest interview with You Magazine where you’ll find her rocking our gorgeous oyster slip by Natalijia whilst giving her stance on the fashion industry.

 

Read on to get Stacey’s look and to find out more about the stunning silks.

Oyster Slip
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"For me to tell you that I'm never going to shop again would be completely dishonest. But I do recognise how powerful I am as a consumer." - Stacey Dooley

Here are a few shocking take-aways from Stacey’s BBC Documentary ‘Fashion’s Dirty Secrets.’

 

It can take over 15,000 litres of water to grow the cotton to make a pair of jeans.

 

 

On the banks of the Citarum River, there are over 400 factories, and activists say many are releasing toxic chemicals every day into waterways across the region.

 

 

Globally, we’re producing over 100 billion new garments from new fibres every single year, and the planet cannot sustain that.

Black Silk Skirt
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Natalija
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At REV, we review each of our designers to ensure that their pieces meet the highest sustainability standards possible.

 

 This includes avoiding single-use plastic packaging, limiting pesticide use when growing fibres and swapping out synthetic materials for plant-based, biodegradable alternatives where possible. Several of our designers, like Mara Hoffman, for instance, are tackling the problem of fabric and water-waste by digitally printing their fabrics.

The Natalija REView

Natalijia is committed to maintaining high ethical, social and environmental standards through all business practices, with manufacturers accredited by Ethical Clothing Australia. The silks are harvested once the silkworms that hatch using sustainable cultivation processes.